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Accepted Courses

Jan 07, 2023: Please note that the following list of courses might include minor details that are subject to change. Please check this page (and the individual course pages) later for updates.

Note regarding the course format: At CHI 2023, courses take place a) either in-person during the conference, b) virtual-only (before the start of CHI 2023), or c) mixed (this means that a few course units will be held virtually before the conference and one or multiple units at the conference). Currently, we do not plan for hybrid presentations (which happen online and in person at the same time).

C01: How to Write Better CHI Papers with LaTeX in Overleaf

Virtual

Duration: 4 units (4 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 19, 2023, starting at 10 CET

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Lennart E. Nacke

Course Website: http://chi2023.chicourse.com/

Description: Writing and structuring research papers is a sought-after skill that will make or break your academic future. This course will improve your skills in writing research papers for academic publication at CHI. In the past five years, my writing course at CHI introduced you to everything you wanted to know about writing papers. Now, it's time to take your skills even further. This course focuses on using LaTeX and Overleaf to format your papers for optimal communication and impact effectively. The course is divided into four online units of 75 minutes, which will guide you through structuring your paper's research content and typographic design. The ultimate goal is to help you communicate a contribution that benefits the field of human-computer interaction through compelling formatting and effective messaging.


C02: DIY Ecological Momentary Assessment

Virtual

Duration: 3 units (3 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 18, 2023, 13:30-14:45, 15:00-16:15, 16:30-17:45

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Sydney Charitos; Amberly Brigden; Jon Bird

Course Website: https://diyema.github.io/

Description: Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) is an increasingly used methodology in HCI which captures an individual's experiences, typically digitally. The benefits of EMA include: reducing recall bias with ‘in-the-moment’ measurement; improving ecological validity with ‘in-the-context’ measurement and enabling exploration of the dynamic interplay of variables from repeated measurement. This course will teach participants about EMA by providing hands-on practical skill development in how to use off-the-shelf software to develop their own EMA system. At the end of the course, participants will be able to rapidly prototype and run custom EMA studies securely and at scale without the usual associated costs.


C03: Structural Equation Modeling in HCI Research using SEMinR

Virtual

Duration: 3 units (3 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Date:
Tuesday April 18th 2023
Time:
15:00–20:00

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

André Calero Valdez; Lilian Kojan; Nicholas Danks; Soumya Ray

Course Website: https://sem-in-r.github.io/chi2023-course-site/

Description: Structural equation models (SEMs) are statistical techniques that help to identify models of latent variables in survey data. This allows
researchers to test both the quality of the measurement instrument—the survey—as well as the hypothesized relationships using a single model. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) is a subset of SEM that works well with small sample sizes and non-parametric data, which frequently occur in HCI research. In this course, we will provide a short introduction into SEMinR, an open-source library for the R language. SEMinR is an easy-to-use domain-specific language for defining, estimating, visualizing, and validating SEMs using the PLS method. SEMinR provides means for scientific reporting and can be used by academics and practitioners alike.


C04: Experiential Educational Accessibility Modules

Virtual

Duration: 1 units (1 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 19, 1600CET

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Daniel Krutz; Heather Moses; Su Thit Thazin; Samuel Malachowsky

Course Website: https://all.rit.edu

Description: Our Accessibility Learning Labs both inform participants about how to properly create accessible software, and also demonstrate the need to create accessible software. Five labs are currently available on the topics of: Colorblindness, Hearing, Blindness and Dexterity. Material is available on our website: https://all.rit.edu
Due to their self-contained web-based nature and the inclusion of all instructional materials (eg slides, quizzes, etc), the labs enable easy integration into a wide variety of curricula ranging from high schools (9-12) to graduate courses. This session will provide an overview of the labs, and usage instructions and information for adopters.


C05: User Experience Design and Research in Games

Virtual

Duration: 3 units (3 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 12, 2023, starting at 16 CET

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Lennart E. Nacke; Pejman Mirza-Babaei; Anders Drachen

Course Website: http://chi2023.gurbook.com/

Description: This online course trains how user experience (UX) methods are used in a game context. The course consists of three units: UX design for games, games user research, and game analytics. The course material comes from the "Games User Research" book published by Oxford University Press, and the book's editors will teach it. This course focuses on UX design and research for game development. Students will learn the skills they need to recognize, analyze, and understand player feedback so they can make valid decisions about how to design games. Through exercises and assignments, participants will learn how to identify factors that affect how a player plays a game and how to incorporate feedback into their design process. Participants will learn ways to get information from players, such as through direct observation, interviews, and surveys. Participants will be equipped with skills, knowledge, and tools to understand players to create engaging games.


C06: Bridging Cultural Differences with Critical Design in a Globalized World

Virtual

Duration: 2 units (2 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Wednesday, April 12, 2023
Time: 16-17:15 & 17:30-18:45

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Huatong Sun

Course Website:

Description: Are simplicity and minimalism the universal standards for interaction design? How can we avoid stereotyping with personas in design practices? What AI algorithms and design mechanism made “digital blackface” phenomenon on social media so popular? This interactive course teaches participants to reconsider some commonly held design beliefs and routine design practices with a lens of cultural differences. Illustrated with design case studies, it introduces strategies and techniques to turn differences into design resources for inclusivity. Participants will learn essential critical design skills of creating engaging and empowering designs in a globalized world at a divisive time.


C07: Create Effective and Responsible AI User Experiences with The Human-AI Experience (HAX) Toolkit

Virtual

Duration: 2 units (2 online, 0 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Wednesday, April 19
16:30-17:45; 18:00-19:15

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Mihaela Vorvoreanu

Course Website: https://aka.ms/haxtoolkit

Description: The HAX Toolkit (https://aka.ms/haxtoolkit) is a set of collaborative tools that helps teams working on user-facing AI plan, create, and evaluate human-AI user experiences. This course will help AI practitioners, human-AI interaction researchers, teachers, and students learn how to use the HAX Toolkit themselves and how to introduce it to others. The Toolkit is grounded in a set of Guidelines for Human-AI Interaction [1] that prescribe how AI systems should behave when interacting with people. Course attendees will explore the nuances of each guideline and learn how to use the AI patterns and examples in the HAX Design Library to apply the Guidelines. Course attendees will also learn how to guide cross-disciplinary teams in planning user-facing AI systems by using the HAX Workbook. For NLP systems, course attendees will learn to use the HAX Playbook [2] to anticipate and design for failures.
The HAX Toolkit is a set of collaborative tools that helps teams working on user-facing AI plan, create, and evaluate human-AI user experiences. This course will help AI practitioners, human-AI interaction researchers, teachers, and students learn how to use the HAX Toolkit themselves and how to introduce it to others. Course attendees will learn the nuances of the Guidelines for Human-AI Interaction, how to lead cross-disciplinary teams in planning human-AI interaction using the HAX Workbook, and how to use the HAX Workbook to plan for failures of NLP systems.


C08: Transparent Practices for Quantitative Empirical Research

Mixed

Duration: 4 units (3 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Dates:
Wednesday, April 12
Friday, April 14
Monday, April 17
Time: 18:00–19:15

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Chat Wacharamanotham; Fumeng Yang; Xiaoying Pu; Abhraneel Sarma

Course Website: https://abhsarma.github.io/transparent-quant-chi-2023-website/

Description: Transparent research practices enable the research design, materials, analytic methods, and data to be thoroughly evaluated and potentially reproduced. The HCI community has recognized research transparency as one quality aspect of paper submission and review since CHI 2021. This course presents current best practices and tools that increase research transparency for HCI researchers and students. The course will be three online lectures and one in-person lab session. The lectures will cover the most relevant concepts, guidelines, and practices in Open Science, frequentist statistics, Bayesian statistics, and uncertainty visualization. In the lab session, the course participants will interactively explore implications of analytical choices using RStudio in pairs or small group and receive tailored feedback from instructors. For any participants cannot come to Hamburg, we will provide a parallel online session.


C09: Introduction to Statistics for HCI Using Jamovi

Mixed

Duration: 2 units (1 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 19, 18:00–19:15

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Jurek Breuninger

Course Website: https://j.breunis.de/CHI2023

Description:


C10: HCI History and Today’s Opportunities – What We Anticipated, What We Did Not

In-person

Duration: 1 units (0 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Jonathan Grudin

Course Website:

Description:


C11: Find your way in the UX process jungle

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Adelka Niels; Jutta Fortmann

Course Website: http://course.bplaced.net/

Description: Many UX process models have emerged over time. Especially beginners, but also advanced users, often find it difficult to orient themselves and to choose a suitable process for a specific project. In the first part of this course, we will explain different UX process models, their similarities and differences, associated UX methods, and their application areas. In the second part, participants will divide into groups to work out a concrete case study, in which they will decide upon suitable processes and methods for a specific use case. The course is designed to inspire, deepen knowledge, and refine practical skills.


C12: Empirical Research Methods for Human-Computer Interaction

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, () late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Scott MacKenzie; Janet Read; Matthew Horton

Course Website: https://www.yorku.ca/mack/CHI2023/

Description: Most attendees at CHI conferences will agree that an experiment (user study) is the hallmark of good research in human-computer interaction. But what constitutes an experiment? And how does one go from an experiment to a CHI paper? This course will teach how to pose testable research questions, how to make and measure observations, and how to design and conduct an experiment. Specifically, attendees will participate in a real experiment to gain experience as both an investigator and as a participant. The second session covers the statistical tools typically used to analyze data. Most notably, attendees will learn how to organize experiment results and write a CHI paper.


C13: Introduction to HCI

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Kasper Hornbæk; Per Ola Kristensson; Antti Oulasvirta

Course Website:

Description: This course introduces the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). In the first unit, we present the characteristics of the field, discussing concepts and goals that distinguish it from other fields. In the second unit, we illustrate how to understand people, conduct user research, describe interaction, distinguish types of user interface, and design, engineer, and evaluate interactive systems. The course is based on an upcoming book (Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction) by the authors.


C14: Interaction Design (IxD) in Digital Games

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Pejman Mirza-Babaei; Samantha Nicole Stahlke

Course Website: http://gamedesignplaybook.com/

Description: This course covers user experience-focused approach to game interaction design. Created with the needs of aspiring game designers in mind, it’s course suitable for HCI and games students, educators and researchers looking for a deeper understanding of how players interact with video games and how these interactions impact player experience. With hundreds of universities worldwide offering digital media and game development programs, interactive technology is a fast-growing field of study. This course flls a much-needed gap in the CHI’s games and play community by connecting interaction design to fundamentals of user experience (UX) and general game design, addressing the needs of students and educators.


C15: The Unwritten Manual of Becoming a Professor of HCI

In-person

Duration: 1 units (0 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Mon 24-Apr () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Florian Michahelles; Susanne Boll; Katie A. Siek; Flora D. Salim; Aaron J Quigley

Course Website:

Description: This course is about preparing researchers for a permanent career in academia. Based on personal practice the course organizers will describe the settings, roles, procedures, and motivations of search and appointment committees. Furthermore, the course will cover strategies for preparing a successful lecture talk, scientific talk, and plans and vision talk. Finally, this course will discuss the do’s and don’t for the interview on leadership and social competencies. A dedicated module on training pitches will enable participants to practice concepts on-site and provide peer review among each other.


C16: CHI2023 Course on How to Peer Review for CHI (and Beyond)

In-person

Duration: 4 units (0 online, 4 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Max L Wilson

Course Website: http://www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~pszmw/peer-review-course/

Description: A key challenge for people that are new to reviewing is pitching the review at the right level, and getting the tone and structure of a review right. This course aims to help participants understand a) the different expectations of different venues and submission types, b) the processes they use to make decisions, and c) good techniques for producing a review for these different circumstances. Combined with developing a good understanding of these different expectations, participants have a chance to critique anonymised but real reviews, and try to guess the venue they are written for and the recommendation they make.


C17: The Design of Interactive Things: Selected methods for quickly and effectively designing interactive systems from the user's perspective

In-person

Duration: 4 units (0 online, 4 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Wendy E. Mackay

Course Website:

Description:


C18: Statistics for HCI

In-person

Duration: 3 units (0 online, 3 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Alan Dix

Course Website:

Description: Many researchers and practitioners find statistics confusing. This course aims to give attendees an understanding of the meaning of the various statistics they see in papers or need to use in their own work. The course builds on the instructor's previous tutorials and master classes including at CHI 2022, and on his recently book “Statistics for HCI: Making Sense of Quantitative Data''. The course will focus especially on material you will not find in a conventional textbook or statistics course including aspects of statistical `craft' skill, and offer attendees an introduction to some of the instructor's extensive online material.


C19: Making the Web Accessible to the Aging Population

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Manasi Atul Vaidya; Sheng-Hung Lee

Course Website: https://www.manasivaidya.com/courses/chi2023

Description: There is evidence that nearly half of the children born in industrialized economies will live beyond 100 years old. While aging populations are not occurring at the same pace in every nation, nearly all nations are experiencing longer lifespans. There will be one in five people in Africa, Asia, and South America over the age of 60 by 2050. Globally, there may be more adults over 60 than children under 15 by 2047. [1] Among the most marginalized groups, older adults are the fastest growing. Each of us will be a member of this group someday. Participants will be provided with objects that simulate visual impairments and arthritis. These aim to generate empathy to understand how older adults may experience the same websites and interactions differently due to their physical limitations, and will also explore ways in which the current interactions can be made better keeping this population in mind.

Do we believe that when we are over the age of 70, we will be able to book a cab and buy groceries online with the same ease as we do today? Do we think older adults are comfortable using technology they are expected to use to perform tasks necessary to function in today's world? Have you ever wondered why older adults need to click on a touchscreen multiple times in order to successfully complete a task? This course will equip you with the tools you need to empathize with the pain points older adults have while navigating the web as well as brainstorm and apply techniques that can make their experience better.


C20: Introduction to Authentication using Behavioral Biometrics

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr () early morning, () late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Jonathan Liebers; Uwe Gruenefeld; Daniel Buschek; Florian Alt; Stefan Schneegass

Course Website: https://www.behavioral-biometrics.org

Description: The trend of ubiquitous computing goes in parallel with ubiquitous authentication, as users must confirm their identity several times a day on their devices. Passwords are increasingly superseded by biometrics for their inherent drawbacks, and Behavioral Biometrics are particularly promising for increased usability and user experience. This course provides participants with an introduction to the overall topic, covering all phases of creating novel authentication schemes. We introduce important aspects of evaluating Behavioral Biometrics and provide an overview of technical machine-learning techniques in a hands-on session, inviting practitioners and researchers to extend their knowledge of Behavioral Biometrics.


C21: Bringing a Coaching Mindset to Supervision & Management: Achieving more by doing less

In-person

Duration: 1 units (0 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Tue 25-Apr () early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Geraldine Fitzpatrick

Course Website: http://www.changingacademiclife.com/coaching-mindset

Description: Supervision and management is a key part of our work as academics yet we are rarely trained how to play these roles well. Responsibility can weigh heavily to give the right advice and have all the answers. But is this the best approach? This course will offer a set of practical conversational techniques that focus instead on the power of good listening and of asking good questions. Such a coaching mindset to supervision and management is a much more effective approach for helping people develop as independent resourceful academics/researchers. It also means doing less to achieve more.


C22: Experience Data-enabled Design!

Mixed

Duration: 3 units (1 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Wednesday, April 12, 3-5pm

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr (X) early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Peter Lovei; Renee Noortman; Sujithra Raviselvam; Mathias Funk

Course Website:

Description: During the Experience Data-enabled Design! (DED) course attendees will learn about designing for intelligent ecosystems while using data as a creative material. After a brief introduction of the method, and (industrial) cases the participants will collect their data from the context of the conference using personalized design probes. This course ofers a careful balance between hands-on work and DED theory. The learning outcomes focus on topics of (physical) prototyping, (remote) data collection and analysis, using data as a creative material, and designing remote interventions.


C23: Let's Get Psychophysiological! A Hands-On Wearables Laboratory Experience with Recording, Processing, and Interpreting Electrophysiology Signals

Mixed

Duration: 4 units (1 online, 3 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Friday, April 14, 3-5pm (15:00-17:00)

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Jennifer J McGrath; Amanda L. McGowan; Paula Lago

Course Website:

Description: Human-computer interaction (HCI) is increasingly taking advantage of psychological, physiological, and behavioral (i.e. psychophysiological) signals both for studying user experience and as implicit interaction mechanisms; yet, acquiring psychophysiological signals requires understanding of fundamental principles that guide measurement and interpretation. The field of psychophysiology is concerned with the interaction of psychological states and physiological activity to uncover the bidirectional ways in which the mind and body intersect with well-established standards. This multi-unit course features fundamental psychophysiological principles, electrophysiological signal acquisition, and hands-on filtering and interpretation using signal processing software. Commonly measured signals include heart rate (HR), accelerometry, respiration, brain waves (EEG/ERP), skin conductance (GSR/SCL), muscle contraction (EMG), eye-tracking, and sleep (PSG). This year’s hands-on activities showcase electrocardiography (ECG) and heart rate variability (HRV). By understanding the fundamentals of psychophysiology, participants will enhance their ability to use psychophysiology in HCI applications.


C24: The Joy of Sketch: A Hands-on Introductory Course on Sketching in HCI and UX Research, Practice, and Education

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Makayla Lewis; Miriam Sturdee

Course Website:

Description: Sketching is a powerful tool for communication, expression, and interrogation – and yet it is also a joyful method that connects people and makes research and education more engaging. Whether hands-on with pen and paper or on a tablet, the manual action of creating an image to tell the story of research is a valuable addition to any student or professional’s skill set in Human-Computer Interaction and User Experience Design. We will take you on a complete journey in sketching, from the basics of mark-making right through to objects, interfaces, and interactions with people.


C25: Ethical Experience Design for the Value of Privacy based on Psychological Needs

In-person

Duration: 4 units (0 online, 4 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, (X) early afternoon, (X) late afternoon

Organizers:

Veronica Hoth; Anne Elisabeth Krueger; Moritz Langner; Stefan Brandenburg

Course Website:

Description: Ethical design can avoid collateral damage by anticipating or counteracting possible negative consequences of technology on society, users, environment, among others. In this course, we aim to provide knowledge about psychological needs and values and the ethical implications of experience-centered interaction design. Therefore, the course consists of three interactive sessions. Each session includes briefings on the scientific background and approach, followed by interactive exercises and discussions so that participants can directly apply and deepen their knowledge. The course concludes with a summary of the learnings and a discussion about the applied methods. The results will be documented and subsequently made available to the participants.


C27: Going Beyond Usability and UX : Adding Dependability, Safety and Security to Interactive Systems and Interactive Technologies

In-person

Duration: 1 units (0 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr (X) early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Philippe Palanque

Course Website:

Description: This course takes both a practical and theoretical approach to introduce the principles, methods and tools for including “non-standards” properties to interactive systems and interaction technologies. The course will focus on safety, dependability and security but will encompass other contributing factors such as privacy, availability and trustworthiness and relate them to HCI-centric properties such as User Experience and Usability. The course will cover design, implementation and evaluation activities to assess these properties. A special attention will be made on how the properties are competing with one another in terms of knowledge of designers and resources required at development time. To paraphrase Susan Dray: “if it is not usable, it does not work” this course will argue that “if it does not work (i.e. not dependable) it is not usable” or “if it is not safe, it is not usable”. The concepts in this course will be supported by multiple concrete examples taken from industries including autonomous cars, aircraft cockpits, large command and control systems but also research labs prototypes targeting at deploying technologies in real-life settings.


C28: Cognitive Modelling: From GOMS to Deep Reinforcement Learning

In-person

Duration: 4 units (0 online, 4 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Wed 26-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, (x) early afternoon, (x) late afternoon

Organizers:

Jussi P. P. Jokinen; Antti Oulasvirta; Andrew Howes

Course Website: https://github.com/howesa/CHI22-CogMod-Tutorial (note: we may change the link to CHI23 later)

Description: This course introduces computational cognitive modeling for researchers and practitioners in the field of HCI. Cognitive models use computer programs to model how users perceive, think, and act in human–computer interaction. They offer a powerful approach for understanding interactive tasks and improving user interfaces. This course starts with a review of classic architecture based models such as GOMS and ACT-R. It then rapidly progresses to introducing modern modelling approaches powered by machine learning methods, in particular deep learning, reinforcement learning (RL), and deep RL. The course is built around hands-on Python programming using notebooks.


C26: Human-Computer Interaction and AI: What practitioners need to know to design and build effective AI systems from a human perspective

Mixed

Duration: 4 units (2 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): April 15, 2023 – 11PM

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Thu 27-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Daniel Russell; Q. Vera Liao; Chinmay Kulkarni; Elena L. Glassman; Nikolas Martelaro

Course Website: https://docs.google.com/document/d/11jW7UYhggEKYdY1blp1pkxuealoGzzqAsmF0sRYfYtg/edit?usp=sharing

Description: As we design and build increasingly sophisticated systems, they’re going to have large pieces that will be AI/ML powered. This course is about how we can take on the challenge of building systems that are AI-based, yet work in ways that are understandable by humans. We’ll take on issues of capabilities, fairness, interpretability, and accountability. We’ll come to learn about what AI systems can (and cannot) do, about what kinds of mental models people have about such systems, and what we can do to design a user experience to make these systems comprehensible. Ultimately, this is a class about the intersection of human intelligence with artificial intelligence—the two don’t necessarily fit well together, and each makes unexpected demands on the other. As we design and build out AI-based systems, we will need to have our own deep understanding of the materials of AI, and understand what’s possible.


C29: HCI Research in Sensitive Settings: Lessons Learned from Technology Design and Ethical Challenges in Dementia

Mixed

Duration: 2 units (1 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable): Wednesday 12/4: 13:00 – 14:15 CEST

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Thu 27-Apr (X) early morning, () late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Maarten Houben; Minha Lee; Sarah Foley; Kellie Morrissey; Rens Brankaert

Course Website: https://maartenhouben.be/chi23-course

Description: In this course, we will share concrete guidelines for HCI research in sensitive settings based on our research experience in dementia. We share how these lessons learned apply in sensitive settings regarding how designing for and with people with dementia has general implications for design and computing. First, we will provide real-world insights on designing technologies in sensitive settings by analyzing example cases from academia and industry. Next, we instruct designers and researchers in practical ethical conduct with stakeholders through hands-on exercises, such as facilitating informed consent and modifying common co-design activities for sensitive contexts.


C30: Respecting, Facilitating and Recognising Children’s Contributions in HCI

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Thu 27-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Janet Read; Matthew Horton

Course Website: https://chici.org/activities/

Description: Child Computer Interaction is concerned with the research, design, and evaluation of interactive technologies for children. Working with children in HCI is rewarding and fun but managing that work so that children are kept comfortable and can participate in meaningful ways is not always easy. This course is based on over 20 years’ experience of working with children in research, design, and evaluation. It will provide attendees with practical tips to organise sessions with children, with signposts to methods for research, design, and evaluation, and will specifically consider the ethics of children’s participation with checklists to support us in doing our most ethical work possible.


C31: The Algorithmic Transparency Playbook: A Stakeholder-first Approach to Creating Transparency for Your Organization's Algorithms

In-person

Duration: 1 units (0 online, 1 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Thu 27-Apr () early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Andrew Bell; Oded Nov; Julia Stoyanovich

Course Website: https://dataresponsibly.github.io/algorithmic-transparency-playbook/

Description: Welcome to 2033, the year when AI, while not yet sentient, can finally be considered responsible. Only systems that work well, improve efficiency, are fair, law abiding, and transparent are in use today. It's AI nirvana. You ask yourself: "How did we get here?" You may have played a major role! As more organizations use algorithmic systems, there is a need for practitioners, industry leaders, managers, and executives to take part in making AI responsible. In this course, we provide for influencing positive change and implementing algorithmic transparency into your organization's algorithmic systems.


C32: The UCD Sprint: A Process for User-Centered Innovation

In-person

Duration: 2 units (0 online, 2 on-site)

Scheduled (virtual units, if applicable):

Scheduled (on-site units, if applicable): Thu 27-Apr (X) early morning, (X) late morning, () early afternoon, () late afternoon

Organizers:

Marta K. Lárusdóttir; Virpi Roto; Rosa Lanzilotti; Ioana Visescu

Course Website:

Description: Exploring innovative ideas for interactive software has its challenges. A new process called the User-Centred Design (UCD) Sprint process has been suggested to support teams in exploring users’ needs and the future usage of the software with the active involvement of users. Research study results show great benefits for the sprint participants. The course introduces the UCD Sprint process, and participants practices two steps from the UCD Sprint: the user group analysis and stating user experience goals. This in-person course appeals to researchers and developers interested in exploring their innovative ideas through a user-centered step-by-step process.